Tag Archive: writing

Nov 27

Submissions now open for Queermance Anthology 2016

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It’s been a while–but yes, Queermance is back and planning for 2016 is happening in earnest. We have a lot of plans for the future, some of which aren’t ready to be talked about, but right now, please sharpen your pencils, grab your favourite pen or charge your electronic device of choice and start writing – because Submissions for Queermance Volume III are now open.

This year we’re looking for the best Oceanic Queer short stories:

Submission Criteria:

  • Between 3000-5000 words in length
  • Showcase one or more queer relationships
  • Have a strong sense of character or strong sense of place that fits with Oceania.
    • For the purposes of this Anthology, we’re defining Oceania as Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Southeast Asia.
  • Stories will be paid with a flat fee of $25 Australian Dollars per story.
  • Submissions are open to all authors regardless of geographical location, gender identity or sexuality.
  • Please send all stories to submissions@queermance.com.au in .docx .rtf .doc or .pdf format.
  • Submissions close midnight Saturday the 30th of January.

This means you can have a story about an Australian in New York, or about two queer aliens crash landing in Singapore or the Solomon Islands as long as the place shines through.

If you’d like to see what we’ve published before, please check out Queermance Vol I, and Queermance Vol II, available as ebooks from Clan Destine Press.

Queermance Vol 1 Cover_S
Queermance Vol 2 Cover

 

Workshop: Non-Boring Collaborative Writing with Hazel Edwards

When: 2:30 PM Sunday 19th of April
Where: The Mercure on Therry Street
Tickets: $30 General Admission, $50 Collaborator Double Pass (2 people)
Bookings: Click Here

Although arguably better known for There’s A Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake, Hazel Edwards rates f2m: the boy within as one of her most important works. Co-written with Ryan Kennedy, a man she’s known since he presented as a nine year old girl, Hazel knows a thing or two about collaborative writing, and has graciously agreed to run a very special workshop on non-boring collaborative writing.

If you are currently planning a collaborative work, Hazel suggests coming along together to get the most out of this workshop.

About the Presenter:
An avid reader (who read under the bedclothes and in the bath), as a young girl, Hazel Edwards wrote her first novel in grade six, a mystery about adventurous children stuck in a mine. This passion for writing and character development continued and after working as a secondary school teacher, at twenty-seven, Hazel published her first novel, ‘General Store’, a book based on life in a rural town.

Since then Hazel has written critically acclaimed childrens and young adult fiction, was awarded the Australian Antarctic Division Arts Fellowship in 2001, and in 2013 was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for services to literature.

Workshop: Reading for your Audience with Karen Corbett

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When: Saturday 18th February, 2:30 PM
Where: The Mercure on Therry
Tickets: $30
Bookings: Click Here

Whether your getting on stage to present your work to your adoring fans, reading to camera for your YouTube channel or just wanting to get better at public speaking, performing for theatre or just giving a speech, sometimes the hardest thing to do is be funny. Be engaging. Be an amazing public speaker. Do you do the funny voices? Do you do character voices. How long should your pauses be? Are these even the right questions to be asking?

Thankfully, we’re here to help. Theatre Queen Karen Corbett is at Queermance to help us all speak better in public. Or for the public. They’re different, but complimentary skills. Grab yourself a ticket or festival pass, and join us for a one of a kind workshop.

About the Facilitator:
Karen Corbett is a Melbourne playwright, actor, director, educator and dramaturge. She has won Australian and international awards for her theatre and fiction, including the Jageurs Irish Australian Literary Prize and the Medal of Ulm for her most recent play Orphanage of the Animals. She was awarded the Murray Sutherland Prize for Outstanding Achievement & Contribution to Theatre at Melbourne University and her work has been nominated for two Premiere’s Awards.

 

 

Mar 10

Panel: Writing What You Aren’t

Image by Drew Coffman

Image by Drew Coffman

10:30 AM Saturday 22rd of March 2014
Mercure on Therry Street

Featuring authors Susan Beck (Weekend at Lennox), NM Harris (Walking Shadows, Talbott and Burns) and Isabelle Rowan (A Note in the Margin). Hosted by Jules Wilkinson (Squee! the Book).

One of the first things you’re told is to write what you know. Of course, if this is the writer’s maxim, one has to ask if one needs to be a sorcerer to write about sorcery, a vampire to write about vampires, or even a gay man to write about gay men.

It’s been an open secret that a large portion of queer fiction–especially male/male fiction–is written by women. Often heterosexual women. A lot of the readers are straight women as well, and there’s even been a book written on the subject.

So how do you write about someone when there’s literally no way to walk any distance in their shoes at all? How do you write about a community you aren’t part of and who can take offence if you don’t get the details right? We ask three of our favourite female authors just that–and for any research tips which might be useful regardless of what you’re writing.

Mar 09

Panel: The ABCs of Social Interaction – Writing Relationships

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10:30AM Sunday 23rd of March 2014
Mercure on Therry Street

Featuring authors Nicole Field (Gothic), Matthew Lang (The Secret of Talmor Manor), and Lindy Cameron (Thicker than Water, Publisher at Clan Destine Press). Hosted by Lisa-Skye. 

We all have relationships. Some are good, some aren’t. Some last for years, some last hours. Describing even one of them fully would easily take more than the eighty to ninety thousand words of your average novel. So what bits do you put in? How do make it compelling? And do you really need to explain to straight people that gender roles aren’t part of a same sex relationship?

We bring you authors who have first hand experience of types of relationships they write about, and written stories that speak to the communities that are featured in their work. Sometimes they write romance. Sometimes they write crime. Sometimes is speculative fiction. But all the time, it’s the crafting of moments–a touch, a conversation, a look–that progress a relationship through the pages of a novel, often while something else entirely is going on.

Whether they’re explicitly sexual or not, or even if you’re writing a friendship rather than a romance, balancing characters and their connections is crucial to any story. Situations come and go, and more often than not the conclusion to a story is assumed to be know. The telling of the journey is what matters, and what makes each journey different are the people that undertake it–the people you create in the realms of your imagination.

Feb 27

Panel: The IKEA of Intercourse – Writing Sex and Erotica

Shocked

11:45AM Sunday 23rd of March 2014
Mercure on Therry Street

Featuring authors Nicolas G. Frank (Wet Pants and Intermittent Relief from Monkey Mind), NM Harris (Walking Shadows, Talbott and Burns)  and Talia Eilon (Managing Editor at Little Raven). Hosted by Karina Quinn (Joint Managing Editor, Writing from Below, La Trobe University).

Writing sex isn’t hard–which is sometimes the problem. Writing good sex guaranteed to get you going hard (literally or metaphorically speaking) is a bit more tricky.

Whether it’s third arm syndrome, body positions requiring three years of training as a contortionist just to get into, or men who somehow manage to cum bucketloads three times a day for five days straight–or not so straight, there are a lot of things that can throw a reader of their stroke.

Whether you’re writing erotica, romantica, queermantica, or just planning on fading to black, there’s a lot to learn from erotic fiction, which demands its writers hold the attention of their audience. After all, when it comes to reading, there’s not much worse than boring sex.